Wild life of Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka is a small but very beautiful island with a rich and ancient history and culture. It is full of the most amazing places to visit and in recognition of the wondrous beauty of these sites have been declared UNESCO World Heritage sites.

Yala National Park

The most visited and second largest National Park in Sri Lanka that provides Safaris among wildlife to its two blocks, now open for public, while the other three blocks are closed for preservation. It was designed as a sanctuary, which now is best known for its variety of wild animals including endemic birds, elephants and leopards. Yala own an array of ecosystems ranging form moist monsoon forests to freshwater and marine wetlands.

After the destruction by tsunami and later due to security problems during the war caused a huge loss, but as it is now conserving and improved, the tourist industry seems to be escalating with locals and foreigners, especially Europeans.

Historically, Yala was believed to have King Ravana’s Kingdom established and later the Indo-Aryan civilization’s large number of tanks and hydraulic system provides proofs dating back to 5th century. During colonial period Yala was a popular hunting ground.

The park is closed from 1st September to 15th October annually due to the heavy drought season and the tanks were filled with water bowsers for animals to drink.

Yala National Park

The most visited and second largest National Park in Sri Lanka that provides Safaris among wildlife to its two blocks, now open for public, while the other three blocks are closed for preservation. It was designed as a sanctuary, which now is best known for its variety of wild animals including endemic birds, elephants and leopards. Yala own an array of ecosystems ranging form moist monsoon forests to freshwater and marine wetlands.

After the destruction by tsunami and later due to security problems during the war caused a huge loss, but as it is now conserving and improved, the tourist industry seems to be escalating with locals and foreigners, especially Europeans.

Historically, Yala was believed to have King Ravana’s Kingdom established and later the Indo-Aryan civilization’s large number of tanks and hydraulic system provides proofs dating back to 5th century. During colonial period Yala was a popular hunting ground.

The park is closed from 1st September to 15th October annually due to the heavy drought season and the tanks were filled with water bowsers for animals to drink.

Kumana National Park

As a block of Yala National Park, Kumana acts as the major bird sanctuary having large flocks of migratory waterfowls and wading birds as well as many other wild animals such as deers, bears, and crocodiles.

Historical evidence shows that Kumana was a part of an ancient civilization back in 3rd century as well as Rock Inscriptions show its history in 2nd and 1st centuries as it lies on the pilgrimage road to Katharagama.

20 lagoons and tanks around and in support the bird life of the National Park  providing nestling areas for the endemic as well as migrant birds as people watches them harmlessly.

Camping and sight- seeing in protective area are now open to the public.

Kumana National Park

As a block of Yala National Park, Kumana acts as the major bird sanctuary having large flocks of migratory waterfowls and wading birds as well as many other wild animals such as deers, bears, and crocodiles.

Historical evidence shows that Kumana was a part of an ancient civilization back in 3rd century as well as Rock Inscriptions show its history in 2nd and 1st centuries as it lies on the pilgrimage road to Katharagama.

20 lagoons and tanks around and in support the bird life of the National Park  providing nestling areas for the endemic as well as migrant birds as people watches them harmlessly.

Camping and sight- seeing in protective area are now open to the public.

Gal Oya National Park

Senanayaka Samudraya – the largest reservoir in Sri Lanka was built under Gal Oya development project by damming Gal Oya. The National Park was later established as the drainage basin for the Senanayaka Samudraya.

The importance here is the elephant herds are out to see throughout the year, unlike in any other National Park. Also many Ayurvedic medicinal herbs are found in this area.

The elevation of the Park alter from 30m to 900m above sea level.

By crossing the reservoir by boat, entering the Park alternatively, there’s a island used by birds for nestling particularly.The area is historically important as Digavapi Stupa built in the 2nd century is believed that Lord Buddha had meditated on his third visit to Sri Lanka.

Gal Oya National Park

Senanayaka Samudraya – the largest reservoir in Sri Lanka was built under Gal Oya development project by damming Gal Oya. The National Park was later established as the drainage basin for the Senanayaka Samudraya.

The importance here is the elephant herds are out to see throughout the year, unlike in any other National Park. Also many Ayurvedic medicinal herbs are found in this area.

The elevation of the Park alter from 30m to 900m above sea level.

By crossing the reservoir by boat, entering the Park alternatively, there’s a island used by birds for nestling particularly.The area is historically important as Digavapi Stupa built in the 2nd century is believed that Lord Buddha had meditated on his third visit to Sri Lanka.

Udawalawe

An open grassland that acts as a sanctuary for the wild, deranged by the fabrication of the Udawalawe reservoir, the area is now a well protected drainage basin as well. Before it was named a National Park in 1972, it was used for shifting cultivation. The farmers were sequentially removed later because of the significant nesting of water birds as well as Sri Lankan Elephants.

As the 3rd most visited National Park in Sri Lanka, it is inflating with a number of locals and foreign visitors.

A series of postal stamps were issued on October  2007 featuring Water Buffalo, Sri Lankan Elephant, Ruddy Mongoose, and Tufted Grey Langur. The park is under the threat of poaching, illegal logging, gem mining and overgrazing as well as from the invasive weeds affecting the food plants of the Elephants. And occasional human- elephant fights, causing the loss of lives from both sides has risked the Park’s security.

Udawalawe

An open grassland that acts as a sanctuary for the wild, deranged by the fabrication of the Udawalawe reservoir, the area is now a well protected drainage basin as well. Before it was named a National Park in 1972, it was used for shifting cultivation. The farmers were sequentially removed later because of the significant nesting of water birds as well as Sri Lankan Elephants.

As the 3rd most visited National Park in Sri Lanka, it is inflating with a number of locals and foreign visitors.

A series of postal stamps were issued on October  2007 featuring Water Buffalo, Sri Lankan Elephant, Ruddy Mongoose, and Tufted Grey Langur. The park is under the threat of poaching, illegal logging, gem mining and overgrazing as well as from the invasive weeds affecting the food plants of the Elephants. And occasional human- elephant fights, causing the loss of lives from both sides has risked the Park’s security.

Wilpattu National Park

The name arose form its anomalous geographical feature – subsistence of “willus” (Natural Lakes). Land of the Lakes – Wilpattu has nearly 60 lakes(willus) and tanks. As one of the oldest National Parks in Sri Lanka, it is strictly preserved for Leopards which was about 35 individuals newly recognized by a survey in 2015. A total of 31 Mammals including Sloth Bears and Barking deers with 28 species of common salient reptiles and 189 species of birds can be seen here approximately. The park is also a famous archeological site as the start of the Sinhala Kingdom in 500 BC was formed from here with a chain of fascinating stories and ruins.

The park was closed nearly 16 years for security reasons due to the civil war. Now that it is open for visitors, only 25% of the area can be visited as the other 75% is a dense forest.

As it is located in the dry zone the best time to visit is from May to September, in the drought, before the major monsoon season as animals gather around Willus often. There are private eco- tourism groups that shows around in Safari trips as well as very protective and camping Bungalows, inside the forest for a night stay to watch leopards.

Wilpattu National Park

The name arose form its anomalous geographical feature – subsistence of “willus” (Natural Lakes). Land of the Lakes – Wilpattu has nearly 60 lakes(willus) and tanks. As one of the oldest National Parks in Sri Lanka, it is strictly preserved for Leopards which was about 35 individuals newly recognized by a survey in 2015. A total of 31 Mammals including Sloth Bears and Barking deers with 28 species of common salient reptiles and 189 species of birds can be seen here approximately. The park is also a famous archeological site as the start of the Sinhala Kingdom in 500 BC was formed from here with a chain of fascinating stories and ruins.

The park was closed nearly 16 years for security reasons due to the civil war. Now that it is open for visitors, only 25% of the area can be visited as the other 75% is a dense forest.

As it is located in the dry zone the best time to visit is from May to September, in the drought, before the major monsoon season as animals gather around Willus often. There are private eco- tourism groups that shows around in Safari trips as well as very protective and camping Bungalows, inside the forest for a night stay to watch leopards.

Galle

Another prime city of Sri Lanka with a history that dates back to 14th century in the records of Ibn Batuta as the main natural port on the island. In both Portuguese and Dutch colonial periods Galle advanced as a fortified city in the South and Southeast Asia being a epitome of their architecture. The Galle fort is now a World Heritage Site and is the largest remaining piece of history in Asia built by Europeans. Also as the home base of Cricket, Galle International Stadium is renowned as the most eloquent Cricket ground in the world highlights the harmony between different cultures gleaming via St. Mary’s Cathedral to one of the main Shiva temples on the island.

With its influential native features of Rumassala in Unawatuna- a beach fringed by a jungle is alluring and brings out the savoring atmosphere of both foreign and local boutiques and hotels.

Galle

Another prime city of Sri Lanka with a history that dates back to 14th century in the records of Ibn Batuta as the main natural port on the island. In both Portuguese and Dutch colonial periods Galle advanced as a fortified city in the South and Southeast Asia being a epitome of their architecture. The Galle fort is now a World Heritage Site and is the largest remaining piece of history in Asia built by Europeans. Also as the home base of Cricket, Galle International Stadium is renowned as the most eloquent Cricket ground in the world highlights the harmony between different cultures gleaming via St. Mary’s Cathedral to one of the main Shiva temples on the island.

With its influential native features of Rumassala in Unawatuna- a beach fringed by a jungle is alluring and brings out the savoring atmosphere of both foreign and local boutiques and hotels.

Central Highlands

An excellent hotspot rising 2500m above sea level is a home to a bizarre range of flora and fauna encircling numerous endangered species. The property is recognized as a World Heritage Site adding up  the Peak Wilderness Area, Horton Plains National Park and  the Knuckles conservation forest. The smooth weather and the enticing scenario of mountains, waterfalls and vegetation add color to this lavish hill country. There’s no better hope to admire nature than trekking through the diaphanous landscapes and countryside in the Central Highlands. The area is popular for hiking along the mountain trails direct beside rivers, past flowing waterfalls and exploring the dense shrubs and herbage covering the remaining part of the rain forests of Sri Lanka. From Adam’s peak via Horton’s steep cliffs to Nuwara Eliya, the journey will leave a everlasting impression in everyone’s mind

Central Highlands

An excellent hotspot rising 2500m above sea level is a home to a bizarre range of flora and fauna encircling numerous endangered species. The property is recognized as a World Heritage Site adding up  the Peak Wilderness Area, Horton Plains National Park and  the Knuckles conservation forest. The smooth weather and the enticing scenario of mountains, waterfalls and vegetation add color to this lavish hill country. There’s no better hope to admire nature than trekking through the diaphanous landscapes and countryside in the Central Highlands. The area is popular for hiking along the mountain trails direct beside rivers, past flowing waterfalls and exploring the dense shrubs and herbage covering the remaining part of the rain forests of Sri Lanka. From Adam’s peak via Horton’s steep cliffs to Nuwara Eliya, the journey will leave a everlasting impression in everyone’s mind